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Cooperation Brazil-Ghana

Cooperation with Ghana
Livelihood Empowerment Against Poverty - LEAP

Cooperation with Ghana

The technical assistance offered to Ghana has consisted of three ten-day missions, comprising MDS experts in areas identified as priorities by Ghana’s government: design of a single registry; anti-child labour policies; and monitoring, evaluation and conditionality in cash transfer programmes.

The missions took place in the second half of 2007.

MISSION

FOCUS

UNIT

PERIOD

First

Mission

Single Registry

National Secretariat of Citizenship Income

2–16 July 2007

Bolsa Família and Single Registry

National Secretariat of Citizenship Income

2–16 July 2007

Technical documents

The Experience of the Single Registry in Brazil: A Tool for Pro-Poor Social Policies

Second

Mission

Single Registry

National Secretariat of Citizenship Income

16 August–3 September, 2007

Monitoring and Evaluation

Secretariat of Evaluation and Information Management

13–24 August 2007

Child Labour

National Secretariat of Social Assistance

25 August–3 September, 2007

Technical documents

Recommendations for a Monitoring and Evaluation System for LEAP

Third mission

Management of Conditionalities

National Secretariat of Citizenship Income

2–17 September 2007

Single Registry

National Secretariat of Citizenship Income

2–17 September 2007

Technical documents

Suggestion to improve LEAP questionnaire

The programme was evaluated by Professor Celina Souza de Castro of the Human Resources Centre at the Federal University of Bahia. The evaluation was based on interviews with the actors involved and was carried out in order to improve cooperation between Brazil, Ghana and other African countries.

The evaluation showed a convergence of interests among all the parties involved. MDS offered support in response to a request for dialogue with other countries on social protection from Brazil’s president and the minister in charge of MDS. According to Ghana’s Ministry of Manpower, Youth and Employment, Brazil’s support helped legitimise the country’s social protection programme, given the international recognition of the results of Brazil’s cash transfer initiative. DFID fulfilled its directive to support a partnership between developing countries with the aim of sharing experiences on social protection. The IPC also fulfilled its institutional mission of fostering South-South cooperation by increasing knowledge in developing countries and their capacity to prepare and implement poverty reduction strategies.

The technical cooperation focused on a discussion with counterparts from Ghana about the formulation and implementation of Brazilian programmes and their operational tools. The government of Ghana was particularly pleased with the support given on the Single Registry and in the area of monitoring and evaluation. The length of the missions (10 days) was deemed appropriate, as was the methodology used.

The Brazil-Ghana pilot programme was considered to be one of the most successful MDS experiences of cooperation because of the support network established by DFID and IPC. DFID’s financial support, the knowledge of MDS and IPC’s technical and administrative backing produced significant synergies that fostered a more sustainable cooperation.

The dissemination of central aspects of Brazilian social protection policies was appreciated by all the parties involved, indicating Brazil’s key role in sharing valuable lessons with low-income countries.

Given the successful outcome, both sides expressed interest in continuing their cooperation. They also identified the need for a follow-up to Brazilian technical assistance in South-South cooperation, and IPC was approached to help in this process. Ghana will be one of the partners in the new phase of the Africa-Brazil Cooperation Programme on Social Protection.

Livelihood Empowerment Against Poverty - LEAP

Ghana designed its National Social Protection Strategy focusing on LEAP, which is based on the Growth and Poverty Reduction Strategy II (GPRS II) of the country. The Programme starts with a 5-year pilot experience in which the main components are conditional and unconditional cash transfers to orphans and vulnerable children (OVC), the elderly above 65 years old and the disabled. In the next five years, the Programme aims at reaching about 160,000 families living in extreme poverty. Last March, LEAP had already made its first cash transfer, and by June, the Programme should cover about 3,200 families in 20 districts throughout the country. By the end of 2008 the Programme expects to cover 15,000 families in 50 districts.

Inspired by the Brazilian experience, throughout 2007, the Programme developed a Single Registry to help with the integration of different social protection initiatives in Ghana. The Programme, run by the Social Welfare Department, is under the coordination of the Ministry of Manpower, Youth and Employment. There are plans for the creation of a Directorate of Social Protection within that Ministry, which would be an embryo of a future Ministry of Social Development. Motivated by LEAP, the Ministry’s current plan for institutional strengthening includes the hiring of new staff and training for all staff members. A National Committee is also being created to give guidance and manage this initiative.

Along the Pilot experience, the Social Welfare Department expects to expand the beneficiaries group, including extremely poor farmers and subsistence fishermen as well as people who are incapable of working and those living with HIV/AIDS.

The selection of recipients will be made through geographical targeting, combined with an initial verification of the list of beneficiaries by the community, the ranking of likely recipients with indicators previously selected and latter submission of the list of the recipients to the community.

The amount paid by LEAP will be of GHC 8.00 (about US$ 8.00) and this amount may reach up to GHC15,00 depending on the number of beneficiaries in the family (max. of four). The payments will be made every two months via the country’s post offices. Through LEAP, the Government expects to promote the recipients’ access to other programmes which target the most vulnerable.

The beneficiary families will be expected to:

  • Enroll and keep all school-age children in school;
  • Register all members of the family in the National Health Insurance Scheme;
  • Register newly-born children (0-18 months-old) at the Registry of Births and Deaths, take them to post-natal clinics and enroll them in the Expanded Immunization Programme;
  • Prevent all children in the family from children traffic and from being involved in any of the Worst Forms of Child Labour.

LEAP’s budget for the first year is of US$ 8 million and it may be raised up to US$ 26 millions by the fifth year. Due to the investments in infrastructure, cash transfers will represent only 22% of the total budget during the first year. Nonetheless, in the following years, cash transfers will become the main expense in the Programme (between 58% and 75% from the second to the fifth year). From 2008 and 2012 the total cost of the Programme should be between 0.1% and 0.2% of the public expenses.

On Monitoring and Evaluation, the programme might carry an initial evaluation; a monitoring of the activities, implementation and outcomes; an evaluation involving beneficiaries; operational audits and an independent impact evaluation at the end. The Ghanaian Government has shown interest in continuing the cooperation with the Brazilian Government, which should take place through visits of Ghanaian technicians to Brazil. Brazilians are also interested in receiving Ghanaian in a study tour mission that should involve other African Governments.

Contacts:

Ministry of Manpower, Youth and Employment (MMYE)